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Mexican Hot Chocolate
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Liz Lamson   

Hatchland Farm is a dairy farm based out of North Haverhill, New Hampshire. I came across their milk during one of my recent trips to Tendercrop Farm in Newbury, Mass. and was excited to bring home a bottle. I have a bit of a guilty pleasure when it comes to farm fresh milk. There is just something so wholesome about enjoying a glass of milk that you know has come from a town or two over rather than being mass-produced on some huge farm in the Midwest. 

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One of my favorite things about this milk is that Hatchland does not use any artificial hormones in their cows. This is a common practice on mass-producing farms to increase their cow’s milk output. Hatchland Farm is a smaller-scale operation, with about 500 cows that are fed homegrown feed consisting of alphalfa haylage, grass haylage, dry hay and corn silage. According to their website, "A comfortable home, healthy food for the cows and proper milking procedures are the first steps in the production of high quality and great tasting milk."
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Local Jam Crepes
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Jon Ross-Wiley   

I recently found myself with the gift of a leisurely Saturday morning.  Looking to make something "fun" for breakfast, I poked around the pantry and refrigerator for inspiration.  It wasn't long before I happened upon a couple jars of jam, locally made by Robin Cohen with locally grown ingredients.

Robin's "Doves and Figs" jams are out of this world, and by themselves, are worth the trip to any farmers' market that features Robin's products.

I wanted to make the jam the star of the show, so I whipped up some quick crepes and filled them with Robin's "Lunchbox Blueberry Strawberry Preserves." Score!

Here's how you can do the same.

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Homemade Bacon
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Jon Ross-Wiley   

The Boston Local Food Festival was amazing yesterday! Terrific energy all around, and the vendor selection was unbelievable. At the Local In Season Do-It-Yourself Demo Booth, we sponsored three demos which included vermicomposting, making a garden in a potato sack, and an awesome live cooking demo from LIS contributing writer, Kate Demase! Patrick and I also shared the "how-tos" of dehydrating apples, sun-drying tomatoes, building root cellar, and making your own bacon. Thanks to all who attended demos.

The bacon demo was quite popular, so I wanted to post the recap here on LIS. I loved talking about my favorite food, and hope you try this at home...you'll be so glad you did!

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Pesto: Not Just for Basil Anymore
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Karen Covey   
Pestos are one of the quickest and easiest sauces you can make and a perfect technique to add to your skill set. But if you think basil is the only way to go, then think again. I've created pestos out of a lot of things and some of my favorites include arugula pesto, spinach pesto and cilantro pesto. Everything gets put into a food processor and you have yourself a simple sauce in no time.
 
The trick is to blend up the produce first, along with the garlic, salt and pepper and the cheese, in this case really good Parmigiano-Reggiano. Once you have it all finely mixed then you want to slowly stream in the olive oil to blend it into a nice paste. It's a great thing to make in a larger batch and freeze in small, individual containers for later use.
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Curry Parsnip Chips
Features - The Craft of Cooking
Written by Jon Ross-Wiley   

When I think of spring in New England, parsnips don't readily jump to mind as something I look forward to. Usually, these root vegetables find their way into my kitchen during the fall and winter months when I am craving a hearty stew or roasted vegetable side dish.  

So, then, why parsnips in May? Simple. One of my favorite, "go-to" spots for fresh local produce, City Feed and Supply, had them and they looked good.

When I am out and about shopping, the ingredients inform my cooking decisions, and I encourage you to try this method on for size as well.  Not only will this keep you from being disappointed when the market doesn't have all the ingredients needed for a recipe you'd like to try, it will allow you to select the produce or meat that is the freshest and looks the best that day. The payoff is worth the gamble. Fresh ingredients require less technique to taste delicious, and, in fact, it is often true that the simplest treatments will result in the best tasting dish.  

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